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Idealists: Immanuel Kant, Gottfried Leibniz, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, George Berkeley, Arthur Schopenhauer, Johann Gottlieb Source Wikipedia

Idealists: Immanuel Kant, Gottfried Leibniz, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, George Berkeley, Arthur Schopenhauer, Johann Gottlieb

Source Wikipedia

Published August 14th 2011
ISBN : 9781155626130
Paperback
74 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 72. Chapters: Immanuel Kant, Gottfried Leibniz, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, George Berkeley, ArthurMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 72. Chapters: Immanuel Kant, Gottfried Leibniz, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, George Berkeley, Arthur Schopenhauer, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, F. H. Bradley, Eugen Relgis, Giovanni Gentile, Thomas Hill Green, Wang Yangming, R. G. Collingwood, David George Ritchie, Hastings Rashdall, Ugo Spirito, Franklin Merrell-Wolff, David Kolb. Excerpt: Immanuel Kant (German pronunciation: 22 April 1724 - 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher from K nigsberg (today Kaliningrad of Russia), researching, lecturing and writing on philosophy and anthropology at the end of the 18th Century Enlightenment. At the time, there were major successes and advances in the sciences (for example, Isaac Newton, Carl Friedrich Gauss, and Robert Boyle) using reason and logic. But this stood in sharp contrast to the scepticism and lack of agreement or progress in empiricist philosophy. Kants magnum opus, the Critique of Pure Reason, aimed to unite reason with experience to move beyond what he took to be failures of traditional philosophy and metaphysics. He hoped to end an age of speculation where objects outside experience were used to support what he saw as futile theories, while opposing the scepticism and idealism of thinkers such as Descartes, Berkeley and Hume. He said that it always remains a scandal of philosophy and universal human reason that the existence of things outside us ... should have to be assumed merely on faith, and that if it occurs to anyone to doubt it, we should be unable to answer him with a satisfactory proof. Kant proposed a Copernican Revolution, saying that Up to now it has been assumed that all our cognition must conform to the objects- but ...let us once try whether we do not get farther with the problems of metaphysics by assuming that the objects must conform to our cognition. Kant published other important works on re...